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Parkour UK Monthly Update – November 2022

As the year draws to a close, we’re here to deliver the final update article of the year. 2022 has been a huge year for Parkour UK, with many exciting pivotal points in the organisation’s history. Here’s Parkour UK’s Monthly Update for November 2022.

December’s update should be out in the first week of January 2023.

UK Coaching Awards

Next week, the UK Coaching Awards take place in Leeds.

Last month, we announced that 3 coaches from the parkour community had been shortlisted as finalists for the awards.

This is the first time in the awards’ 25-year history that parkour coaches have become finalists and is a huge achievement for both the coaches involved and the sport as a whole.

Once again, Parkour UK want to congratulate our 3 finalists for their achievements, and we look forward to seeing you in Leeds on 6th December!

Finalists:

Callum Windsor – Young Coach of the Year
Sam Coppack – Coaching Podcast of the Year
Adam Romaine – Change A Life Award

Parkour UK Jobs – UPDATE

Following the success of expanding the workforce earlier this year, throughout October/November, we hosted our second wave of recruitment.

We were hiring for two new part-time roles.

  • Finance Support
  • Workforce Support

Also, we have been looking for subcommittee members in the areas of.

  • Finance, Audit & Probity
  • Diversity & Inclusion

Applications have now closed for these roles and recruitment has concluded. Expect an update from us regarding these soon.

Mental Health First Aid – Peterborough

Parkour UK is running its second Mental Health First Aid England course, delivered by Parkour UK’s Head of Development, Chris Grant at the start of December. The course will take place over two days, ( The 1st and 2nd of December) in Peterborough.

Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a training course that teaches people how to identify, understand and help someone who may be experiencing a mental health issue.

MHFA won’t teach you to be a therapist, but it will teach you to listen, reassure and respond, even in a crisis – and even potentially stop a crisis from happening.

You’ll learn to recognise warning signs of mental ill health and develop the skills and confidence to approach and support someone while keeping yourself safe.

The MHFA course costs £85, a heavily discounted rate, and is perfect for individuals, coaches, or members of organisations who are looking to learn something that may benefit their everyday life or workplace.

We will be looking at running more Mental Health First Aid courses in 2023. Please don’t hesitate to reach out if you or your coaching organisation are interested.

Our First MHFA Course – Brighton July 2022

2023 Course Dates – UPDATE

So far, no 2023 dates have been officially announced for any upcoming Level 1 or Level 2 Parkour UK courses. As stated in our last monthly update, we have mapped the dates for Level 2 courses through 2023.

The Good News!
Course dates will be announced by the end of the year, with information regarding the new Level 2 format coming early next year. The Level 2 course is expected to start in March.

We will send out an email once these dates are confirmed and announced.

Our Latest Level 1 Course – Peterborough

All Hands Meeting

Following our attendance at the UK Coaching Awards in Leeds on December 6th, the team is spending the following two days together. This is for our quarterly all-hands meeting. We previously held our all-hands meeting in Brighton.

The last all-hands meeting meant we were able to report our progress in a way that we hadn’t before, with Lynn, Callun, Simon, and Kieran all presenting to the board in their area of expertise, following answering the questions the board had asked them.

There is no board meeting this time round, but with it being the last all-hands team meeting of the year, it gives us the chance for the team to update everyone on their progress, and the steps we are going to take in 2023.

Teachers CPD Qualifications

As 2022 closes, we have had a surge in demand for Teachers’ CPD courses. Our CPDs allow for parkour to become part of the PE syllabus in schools and help equip teachers with the skills they need to deliver safe and efficient parkour coaching.

If you are interested in a Teacher CPD course in your school or area, please do not hesitate to get in touch with Simon. ( simon.vardy@parkour.uk )

Our Latest Teacher’s CPD in Durham in November

That’s it for our monthly updates for the year.

Remember, our Parkour UK members get these updates early VIA email. You can sign up for a membership here.

Our next update will be available in the New Year.

Have a great Christmas and New Year!

The Parkour UK Team

Getting Started With Parkour – Training In The Winter

Training parkour in the winter, or in wet, rainy conditions in a safe and controlled manner is encouraged here at Parkour UK.
The UK is notorious for horrible weather during the winter. Lots of rain, heavy snowfall, and dark, cold evenings approaching quicker seem to be regular, but we strongly believe you should still practice parkour, whatever the weather!

Here are some examples of training in different weather conditions.

Glasgow Parkour Coaching – Winter Girls Class
Glasgow Parkour Videos – Snow Training November 2010

We also have information, advice, and guidance (IAG) on our website which details a little bit more regarding training outdoors.

Parkour/Freerunning is a sport that needs and requires the same dedication, discipline, and attention as any other sport.

Parkour encourages humility, respect for others and for one’s environment, self-expression, community spirit, and the importance of play, discovery, and safety at all times.

Our IAG outlines some important practices for parkour traceurs and practitioners to follow. We have also listed this below, but will highlight some of the key points for training in winter conditions, and build on them for some extra information.
Of course, it goes without saying. All of our recommendations are important, regardless of the weather or situation you are training in, but being able to adapt is a key skill of parkour, and some additional details need to be focused on.

It is recommended that practitioners:

  • Select an appropriate training area
  • Be respectful of your surroundings
  • Check your surfaces and structures
  • Leave the area you’re training in as you found it (or tidier than it was!)
  • Be courteous to members of the public, other practitioners, and those around you
  • Think of the health of your body, both in the short and long-term
  • Appropriately assess the level of the movements being performed against your own skill level
  • Train in an overall safe and healthful manner: remember the central motto of Parkour/Freerunning is ‘To Be and To Last’
  • Through your actions and conduct always be a good ambassador for Parkour/Freerunning

Selecting An Area, Be Respectful of Your Surroundings, and Checking Your Surfaces

When it is dark, cold, wet, or covered in snow, it is always crucial to select an appropriate training area. Some areas might be out of reach during these times, particularly in the snow. Whilst we do recommend trying to hit your regular training spots, please don’t put yourself at any risk trying to access these areas.
When heavy snow falls, individuals and businesses have to slightly adapt. Because of this, training in some highly populated areas might not be possible. Again, use your initiative and previous history at spots to gain an understanding of the wider picture.

Checking your surfaces should be done during any training session, regardless of the conditions you are training in. In parkour, our trust should come 100% in our abilities and what we are able to do. Leaving even the smallest bit of faith on an unchecked surface could result in injury. Go through the usual checks, the weather may have weakened some structures. Of course, if you’re training in the rain, check the surfaces you are landing on also. Adapt to the environment around you, understand your ability, and do not put yourself at unnecessary risk.

Parkour jump in the snow. Parkour in winter
Glasgow Parkour Videos – Cat Leap / Arm Jump in the Snow

Appropriately assess the level of the movements being performed against your own skill level / Training in a safe manner

Building on the last point, appropriately assess the level of the movements being performed against your own skill level. Training in dark, wet, icy, or snowy conditions may not be the best time to see how far your running precision (A jump from one precise point to another) is.

Use this time to drill technique, practice landings, or explore different styles of movement. If you deem anything unsafe to try, listen to your body and mind. It isn’t worth risking injury for the sake of a movement.

Through your actions and conduct always be a good ambassador for Parkour/Freerunning

No matter the weather, being a good ambassador for Parkour & Freerunning is always something to follow when out training. Members of the public might be confused as to why you’re training during these conditions. Take the time to engage with members of the public, explain what it is you’re doing, and the benefit it has on you, and leave every conversation and interaction better than how it started.

Other Tips

Undercover Spots: If you’re lucky, your local training area may have some undercover spots that are sheltered from the worst of the weather conditions. This does not mean it will always be perfect. Some of these spots might be damp or icy still, so all of the points above still remain. Try mixing it up a little bit. Have the undercover spot as part of your training day, rather than the sole focus.

Indoor Facilities: There are a number of parkour gyms open across the UK that run open jam sessions throughout the winter. These indoor facilities can be used to practice some techniques and movements in a safe environment. You can check out a list of member organisations and gyms here.

Monthly Update – October 2022

Every month, we will be putting together a monthly update on our website to keep you guys updated with everything we have been working on at Parkour UK. Here is our monthly update for October 2022.

Upcoming Courses

This December, Parkour UK is running its second Mental Health First Aid England course, delivered by Parkour UK’s Head of Development, Chris Grant. The course will take place over two days, ( The 1st and 2nd of December) in Peterborough.

Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a training course that teaches people how to identify, understand and help someone who may be experiencing a mental health issue.

MHFA won’t teach you to be a therapist, but it will teach you to listen, reassure and respond, even in a crisis – and even potentially stop a crisis from happening.

You’ll learn to recognise warning signs of mental ill health and develop the skills and confidence to approach and support someone while keeping yourself safe.

The course will cost £85, a heavily discounted rate, and is perfect for individuals, coaches, or members of organisations looking to learn something that may benefit their everyday life or workplace. You can find out more information and book yourself onto the course here.

2023 Course Dates

So far, no 2023 dates have been officially announced for any upcoming Level 1 or Level 2 Parkour UK courses. As stated in our last monthly update, we have mapped the dates for Level 2 courses through 2023, which will be announced once we are confident that the materials are going to be ready. Progress is being made, but we want to be 100% sure all the materials are there before we start announcing the course dates.

We will send out an email once these dates are confirmed and announced.

A photo from our latest Level 1 course in Peterborough

New Roles

Parkour UK is looking to recruit 2 more individuals in part-time roles for the organisation.

We are currently hiring for

  • Finance Support
  • Workforce Support

All the information can be found on our website (Click Here).

These jobs are part-time roles, this will offer the opportunity to fit around other commitments and give the flexibility to work on a variety of assignments. We want the organisation to reflect the society we live in and work across and would encourage applications from in and out of our community.

We are also holding a recruitment surgery on the 3rd of November at 4:30 PM.

Applications are open until 12 pm on the 7th of November.

Speaking With Our Members

Following the digital team coming on board earlier this year, we have now had the opportunity to sit down and have a discussion with some of our members regarding their work within parkour. You may have seen some articles being posted to our website, or shared on our Facebook & LinkedIn profiles where we dive into discussions with some of our Parkour UK members.

Recently, we have had the pleasure of speaking to Sam Coppack regarding his very successful “York Takeover” parkour event (Read Here.), and a conversation with Team Reality regarding a partnership with a local community project, and their efforts on tackling the public’s perception of parkour in their area (Read Here.)

We are really looking to elevate and tell the stories of our members, so if you have a story you would like Parkour UK to share, please get in touch via our Instagram and let’s get a conversation going.

Our Annual General Meeting Date

Our AGM (Annual General Meeting) this year is going to be Tuesday the 29th of November at 12 PM. The event will be held online in its entirety, and the following documents will be made available on November 18th, in preparation for the meeting.

  • AGM Agenda
  • 2021 AGM Minutes (Draft)
  • The Directors’ Report & Financial Statements for the year ended 31st March 2022.
  • Parkour UK – Proposed Memorandum & Articles of Association including a summary of the proposed amendments
  • Voting Form (Affiliate Member)
  • Proxy Voting Form (Affiliate Member)

More details will be released soon, but for now, save the date.

Parkour Coaches Become Finalists in the UK Coaching Awards

Some brilliant news to close our monthly update. Three parkour coaches have been announced as finalists in the UK Coaching Awards. The UK Coaching Awards offer the chance to celebrate great coaching with the entire coaching community, experience real-life coaching stories from across the UK, and be amazed by the people who transform lives. This is the first time parkour has been included in the UK coaching awards.

Parkour UK would like to congratulate,

Callum Windsor (Aspire Parkour AcademyParkour UK Affiliate Member)
Callum is a finalist for the “Young Coach of the Year” Award. Supported by Reading Room this award recognises the excellent work of a young coach who has helped and inspired people to reach their sport and physical activity needs and aspirations.

Sam Coppack (The Parkour Coach Companion Podcast – Parkour UK Professional Member)
Sam is a finalist for the “Coaching Podcast of the Year” Award. This award recognises a coach-led podcast that delivers, inspires, and informs #GreatCoaching.

Adam Romaine (Access Parkour)
Adam is a finalist for the “Change a Life” award, supported by Sport England. This award recognises a coach who has empowered and inspired an individual from a diverse community through #GreatCoaching.

That’s our update for this month. Please feel free to get in touch with us on Instagram. We would love to hear from you!

The Parkour UK team

Engaging The Community & Challenging Public Perception – Team Reality (Member Highlight)

TEAM REALITY LTD are Parkour UK Afilliate+ members based in Grimsby.

Team Reality is a parkour team first formed in 2007 originating from the Grimsby/Cleethorpes area, founded by the duo of Jake Harris and Neil Huston. Since 2010, Team Reality have been coaching their own parkour sessions to a range of individuals of all ages within their community.

Fast forward 12 years and Team Reality is thriving. They have a new partnership with Sidney Sussex Park, a group that is based within a local park who have been putting on events, functions, and activity days for the local community. 

I spoke to Jake Harris at Team Reality about the partnership, asking him about the partnership, who approached whom, and what the steps moving forward were.

Jake states:

They reached out to us. We’ve worked within the local community for many years. I think there were some mutual friends and connections, and we were recommended.  

Throughout the summer, we had the opportunity to join them for some fun in the park and give the local area around the park the chance to try parkour or just explore movement in a way they may not have before. 

This partnership wasn’t just for the summer holidays. Team Reality runs its own indoor facility, where they teach over 100 participants a week. Because of the access to this space, Team Reality has continued the partnership into the winter months.

No alt text provided for this image

As the weather has started to turn, we have been fortunate enough to bring the local community to our own facility to progress on the introduction to parkour and give them a greater experience in the sport. It also brings the community together, keeping warm and dry within our academy. 

Jake, and the other Team Reality coaches, have a very clear and passionate drive to want to make a positive change in their community, whilst also tackling the public’s general perception of parkour. Back in September, an article was published on the Grimsby Telegraph website about a group of individuals practicing parkour on the rooftops of the local area. (Read Here.)

A few days later, one of the Team Reality students, who was pictured in the article, approached the Grimsby Telegraph to explain his side of the story. (Read Here.)

The 15-year-old student highlights the positive change the Team Reality guys have made in his life growing up and in others in the community.

I’ve been coached by people with 20 years of experience in the sport and it’s a great way to become involved in a community. Everyone supports one another and we get on really well as a group.

I started at six and only got to where I am with the help of my coach’s constructive criticism. It boosted me in the sport and as a person in the long run.

In a further follow-up to this article, Team Reality took the responsibility of inviting a Grimsby Telegraph reporter down to their indoor facility for a day of parkour training. This was to help individuals outside of the sport gain a deeper understanding of how the sport is practiced at ground level and in a safe environment, before taking things up to height.

Jake states:

There was an article about ‘youths jumping roof gaps’ which happened to be one of our older experienced students. They then did an article with him about parkour and now they are coming to us to have a go

The article highlights Team Reality’s passion for instructing parkour to anyone at any age and tells the story of the reporter trying parkour for the first time. You can read this article here.

Parkour is still an incredibly new sport. It is also the only sport where you don’t need equipment, a facility, or an instructor to really go out and give it a try. It is also one of the first new sports to grow up in tandem with social media. Because of this, videos of people jumping off rooftops are attention-grabbing and tend to go viral, which, in turn, makes experienced parkour practitioners (traceurs – the French term) look like adrenaline junkies with very little prior experience.

The publics view is definitely more positive than its ever been, but we can always do our part to help educate others on the sport. Every sport has dangerous elements and we want to shine a light on the hard work that goes into practicing parkour correctly, and it’s not just about the danger.

It is people like the Team Reality team who are challenging the public’s perception of parkour by offering the local community new, exciting, and engaging ways to challenge the environment around them, promoting a sense of community, self-progression, and exercise.

To finish, I have linked Team Reality’s YouTube channel, where they upload weekly videos of their training, as well as highlight some of the students from their classes.

York Takeover – The New Parkour Competition Format Highlighting A More Inclusive Approach.

At Parkour UK, we want to highlight community competitions and events that happen throughout the year.

As the world is slowly adapting to life after the initial COVID outbreaks, social contact is slowly starting to return to normal for the first time in two years.

After two years of very few parkour events, both internationally and nationally, parkour events and competitions have started to pick up again.

The newest of these community-organized parkour competitions include “Takeover” events.

Takeover events are when an individual or group from the parkour community spends some time compiling a list of challenges in their city. Parkour practitioners will then descend onto the city, trying to complete as many challenges as possible in a set time frame (Typically a day or two.)

The first of these events popped up in the UK earlier this year, the first being the Sheffield Takeover.

Since then, a second Takeover event has been held in York, with another being announced in Liverpool for November of this year.

The York Takeover had 50 Parkour Challenges under 4 categories.

  • York Classics: A collection of challenges celebrating the heart of York Parkour, and the people who have trained there.
  • Old School: A collection of challenges inspired by the Yamakasi, focusing on grit, strength, and endurance.
  • New School: A collection of challenges inspired by recent trends in Parkour. Think spins, funk, and tekky weirdness.
  • Flow: A collection of challenges involving the smooth linking of movements together.

The event had a prize pool of over £400, split evenly between the Men’s and Women’s divisions. Within the last few years, the vast majority of the parkour community has been pushing for equal prize money in competitions for men and women. Community-organized parkour events have been leading this change within the sport.

A parkour event in Norway, called the “Oslo Movement Gathering” also donated £100 to help with equal prize money.

I spoke to Sam Coppack. Sam is a “Professional Member” at Parkour UK and hosts the Parkour Coach Companion podcast. He is also responsible for hosting the York Takeover event a few weekends ago. He kindly gave me some insight into the event from an organizer’s perspective and gave some tips on what to do if you want to host your own city takeover event.

So, getting started, I asked where the inspiration for the York Takeover came from.

“The Sheffield Takeover was a major inspiration for our York Takeover event. Their 2-day, 100-challenge format was a big success, and I felt that it was a new, interesting strand of parkour street competition. I absolutely loved the experience, and as soon as I got home, I began thinking about the logistics of a York Takeover event.

I also have to give huge credit to people like Renae Dambly, who on my podcast, The Parkour Coach Companion, explained her “Search and Destroy” jam, which had a similar format.”

Sam is mostly by himself in the York scene. The planning of the event took almost a month of dedicated hard work and preparation. This involved taking photos of all the challenges, annotating them, announcing and advertising the event (mostly through social media), building a spot map for York, and managing prizes, such as money and discount codes from parkour brands.

Parkour UK, group of parkour practitioners, York Takeover 2022, Parkour UK
The York Takeover Event – Phot from @York_Gents Instagram

“I spoke to lots of people online and sought after some advice from the organizers of the Sheffield Takeover, Adam Dore and Liam Norbury. On the day, Ollie (Sam’s Housemate) had been building a spreadsheet for the points recording, and I sought more help from Dean Stimpson about the scoring and other logistics. He gave me some moral support.

I was very nervous, and honestly, I put a bit too much work on myself.”

Of course, like any casually organized parkour event, there were some concerns.

“Weather, injuries, and being moved on from spots were the main areas of concern. Thankfully, the weather held out, and there was only one significant injury (a sprained wrist), and only got moved on from a few spots. I was disappointed to find that, in the morning prior to the event, there had already been an incident with the residents, but I gave a strong word to contestants which seemed to work for the rest of the day.”

I asked Sam if he thought the day was a success and if he had any areas of improvement for next time.

“I can happily say it was a success. We managed to sell over 50 tickets for the event, there were few injuries, and we were only moved on from a few spots. I received a lot of praise throughout the day, and afterward too. York has never seen so much parkour in one day. There was something special about seeing people jumping around every corner you turned.

We pooled enough money for a Women’s category and a 16 and Unders category too. This helped attract students from up North. NBDs (Never Been Done Challenges) were conquered, Greggs was eaten, and Instagram was flooded with hundreds of challenges being completed.

My format was experimental and a little complicated, but gave contestants an interesting experience, and catered to a broad skill set.

The scoring was very full-on. Ollie sat inside for about 6 hours, and both Dean and I had to help throughout. We had to postpone the awards ceremony because we hadn’t finished, meaning some people had already left for their trains. We got some of the scores wrong, including the women’s podium, which was frustrating and embarrassing.

More hands on deck were definitely needed, and we could have perhaps staggered the points onslaught by enforcing a midday break, where everyone submitted at the same time, rather than relentlessly.

Some feedback from the community also mentioned that the event felt a little rushed, with only 6 hours to complete 50 challenges. For some, this sense of adventure was a great way to test themselves, but for others, it drained the enjoyment of training.

We could have advertised earlier and harder, especially to get more women to get involved. We only had 3.”

I went on to ask Sam about the future of Takeover events, and whether or not he would like to see more.

“I would love to see more Takeovers. They are a fantastic way to get a real sense of a city and are exciting to those that thrive on treasure hunting and exploring. I’m already excited for the confirmed Liverpool Takeover this year, as well as whisperings from many other communities making moves. I expect we’ll see a number of takeover events next Spring when the sun comes back. The scope is massive. If they catch on we could be seeing Takeover style events across the world, and that would be wonderful.”

Sam kindly gave me a list of advice for organizers of Takeover events, which I have detailed below.

  • Get a team together to organize the event.
  • Ensure it’s fair, equal, and inclusive (Both people and skill levels)
  • Don’t be afraid to be a bit experimental, new ideas can spread.
  • Communicate with previous organizers of Takeover events.
  • Advertise clearly, but ask questions to the community.
  • Think carefully about your points system.
  • Be clear, and strict, on your challenges.
  • Consider safety aspects and respect for the city and the people within it.
  • Find the best parking locations.
  • Advertise hard, and don’t be afraid to reach out to brands for sponsorship and donations.

A huge well done to Sam and all of those involved in the organization of the event. Make sure you follow the York Gents on Instagram by clicking the link here.

Monthly Update – September 2022

Every month, we will be putting together a monthly update on our website to keep you guys updated with everything that has gone on at Parkour UK.

A Full Team

In September, Simon Vardy settled into his role as Workforce Lead, taking over Kieran’s previous role.

Simon will be helping us accelerate the development of our Level One Coaching Qualification & our Level Two Coaching Qualification. Simon’s role will also look for new opportunities for the workforce. Simon is an experienced performance coach with a demonstrated history of working in the higher education industry and professional sports up to the elite level.

Our previous workforce lead, Kieran Wylde has moved positions at Parkour UK and will be working in our membership lead role, helping accelerate our memberships here at Parkour UK.

This finishes the employment of people from our employment day we ran back in June of this year, with a team now working in digital support, workforce, and membership

It’s really exciting and brilliant having a team now at Parkour UK. Chris Grant (PKUK’s head of development) is always ecstatic about logging onto the weekly all-hands meeting and seeing a team full of people working together.

Parkour UK Meets With The Board

In the closing weeks of September, the full team traveled to Brighton for the quarterly board meeting. We were able to report our progress in a way that we hadn’t before, with Lynn, Callun, Simon, and Kieran all presenting to the board in their area of expertise, following answering the questions the board had asked them.

We spent time discussing each of the areas that Parkour UK is currently focusing on, and spent some time together, before having some lovely food.

It was really great having the full team together, in one place, to discuss Parkour UK’s current path, projections, and areas of focus.

The Parkour UK Team – (left to right) Callun, Lynn, Kieran, Chris, Dan, Simon.

Below, we have summarized some of the topics of discussion, and steps going forward in different areas of the organization.

Membership: We spent a large chunk of the Tuesday discussing what our membership might look like, trying to categorize the community to look at what we might be able to offer in terms of knowledge and services across the whole of the community. This includes improving what we have already (such as coaching), but what we can also do to help support content creators, freelancers, athletes, etc. It was an exciting conversation that we are excited to get the ball rolling on. This is where Kieran, our Membership Lead, will be focusing his work in the next 6 months to a year.

Digital and Story Telling: Callun and Lynn reported to the board about our socials with really good statistics and measures. Our socials have received a tonne of engagement, interaction, and positive comments since the digital team came on board back in mid-July. On top of this, Lynn has also been working on a huge mapping document trying to capture the name, location, and purpose of different parkour teams, organizations, groups, and freelancers across the country within the parkour space.

Workforce: With the new school year starting, we are getting back into schools, and running Teacher CPD courses. We have also mapped all the dates for Level 2 courses through 2023, which will be announced once we are confident that the materials are going to be ready. Our plan is to announce the courses for the whole year to allow some flexibility to allow you to book. We will, eventually, work towards this for the Level One courses also.

Toolkits

Something that did pop up during our discussion was the toolkits we have on our website. We have a bunch of free toolkits available on our website, which you can find here. There is a range of toolkits, including “How to start a university society”, a “Business” toolkit, and “Risk Assessment” toolkits, all available to you, so please check them out.

Email Updates and Facebook Group For Members

We are currently working on building up our email newsletter for our member organizations and individuals again. This had some traction before, but earlier this year it dropped off a little bit. Now, with the digital team onboard, we have the capacity as an organization to fill these tasks to a standard we are happy with.

Storror’s Big Wall Open

Of course, we couldn’t do an update of September without mentioning Storror’s monumental street event, the “Big Wall Open.” – Callun visited the event, watching it all unfold.

The event was brilliant. It was amazing seeing how many people turned up. Not just parkour practitioners, but young children and their parents, many of who don’t train in parkour, they have just come down and appreciate the sport, speaking with the community, and getting to know more about the sport. Storror’s impact on the sport we love has been incredible, and I know this event has cemented itself as one of the sports’ best, but as a stepping stone to get so many other people into parkour.

Callun speaking about the Storror Big Wall Open

Community Posts

At the start of September, we started rolling out a weekly post of some movements from the parkour community. The feedback from these posts has been amazing, with the community loving the idea of us using our platform to show the progression and practice of those within our sport. Make sure you use the hashtag #ParkourUK so we can see your clips! Remember to also follow us on Instagram, @ParkourUK